62 posts tagged with science.
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Crowd-sourcing image classifications for the physics of the Caribbean steelpan

I have used a TV holography system equipped with a high-speed camera to capture the motion of waves on a Caribbean steelpan (also called a steel drum) at over 10,000 frames per second. The movies that come out of the measurements are really interesting to watch, because they show the build up of energy in the different notes of the steelpan. What we need is help in classifying the images, because this is something that cannot easily be done algorithmically right now. We would love to have people who are interested in science, music, or especially the science of music come help us out!
posted by achmorrison on Feb 14, 2017 - 0 comments

Is the Future Already Set?

We think the past is immutable and the future is yet to be written. But is that an illusion? Einstein's special relativity suggests that it is, as I explain in this short animated video produced in collaboration with BBC Earth.
Also featuring: space invaders! 🚀🚀🚀
First in a new series. [more inside]
posted by freelanceastro on Feb 6, 2017 - 0 comments

Run the Solar System: a free audio-driven 10k virtual race

Run (or walk) from the Sun to Neptune in 10k! My company created this smartphone-driven educational virtual race for the British Science Association on our new Racelink platform. It comes with kilometer-by-kilometer narration by Dallas Campbell, who does fun science and space things on TV in the UK, and it's 100% free to enter - all you need is an iPhone or Android.
posted by adrianhon on Jan 17, 2017 - 1 comment

SciBookChat

I've been making some videos about science and books. They're not reviews of science books, but more discussions of things related to how science and scientists are presented in books. For example, in what I retroactively called "season 1" I looked at parody science books. I'm now in "season 2", where there'll be a new episode every two weeks until the end of the year. The first one of the season involved a bookshop tour to discuss different types of non-fiction books, and the next one (November 3) will be about how the representation of scientists in fiction has changed over the years. Specifically: how and why is Frankenstein different from The Martian's Mark Watney?
posted by easternblot on Oct 24, 2016 - 0 comments

A Year of Stories: Cobalt Blue

At the beginning of the year I decided to write one short story, every weekday, until December 31st (260 stories). To help motivate me, I'm releasing twelve Collections of these stories on Amazon. I've been at this since January, and so far I'm 135 stories in. This is Collection one, if you like it, it would be awesome if you could leave a review. Also, if you're interested in following the project in real-time, you can see all the stories here.
posted by socalsamba on Jul 11, 2016 - 0 comments

MacAvoy and Me

Tea with the Black Dragon Author R.A.Macavoy asked me to work with her on a book... (I KNOW, right?!?!) We've now finished. [more inside]
posted by Nancy_LockIsLit_Palmer on Feb 22, 2016 - 3 comments

Elements around the world

I've been marking up a map of the world with locations relevant to a particular chemical element (so far just sulfur, arsenic, and iron). Each mark includes a brief description with links to additional information.
posted by bismol on Jan 27, 2016 - 6 comments

Antartic Fairy Tales

Folklore from the inhabitants of the 7th continent
posted by The Whelk on Dec 8, 2015 - 6 comments

Explaining Einstein's General Relativity on its 100th Anniversary, with the BBC

It's the 100th anniversary of Einstein's theory of General Relativity! The BBC recorded a conversation with me about Einstein's ideas, and they turned that recording into a short animated video. If you want to know more about general relativity, then (in my extremely biased opinion), this is a simple and fast explanation of the basic idea. (Also, I do not own the shirt that my animated avatar is wearing, but I wish I did.) [more inside]
posted by freelanceastro on Nov 18, 2015 - 2 comments

Black Hole Citizen Science Site

I'm trying to develop a site to advance astronomy research and education. Layperson volunteers help to classify the very complicated X-ray flickering of black hole system GRS 1915+105. [more inside]
posted by Schmucko on Nov 10, 2015 - 0 comments

The Bench Warmers Podcast

A Podcast about the misadventures and victories of a life in the sciences. As told and lived by Graduate Students. We mimic the format of This American Life (more or less) to chronicle the crazy stories and hijinks of current and former graduate students via interviews. This month's episode (there are four out so far) asks "What Would You Do For Your Data". [more inside]
posted by Archibald Edmund Binns on Nov 2, 2015 - 1 comment

Rosin Cerate

An intensely researched blog mostly about weird and esoteric characteristics of living things. Also lakes and video games.
posted by bismol on Jul 9, 2015 - 2 comments

R2d2 takes unfair advantage of females

Our group at the University of North Carolina has just published a paper (open access) on an exciting new female meiotic drive system that we call R2d2. There is also a nice accompanying perspective article (also open access) from researchers at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Institute in Seattle. Read on for a short description of meiotic drive and the findings of the paper. [more inside]
posted by infinitemonkey on Feb 14, 2015 - 0 comments

IGNITE: Women Fuelling Science and Technology

IGNITE aims to highlight women and girls working in STEM in various ways - as developers, artists, activists, community organisers, educators, and much more. We're also collecting #BeTheSpark stories on how you got interested in STEM, so if you have a story to share please contribute!
posted by divabat on Nov 19, 2014 - 0 comments

Regret Labs science podcast

Did you study hard in science class? Neither did comics Aric and Levi. Regret Labs is their attempt to make up for lost time. In each episode they attempt to explain a scientific concept and then invite a guest expert to join them and tell them how very wrong they are. [more inside]
posted by a47danger on Jun 2, 2014 - 2 comments

'Status' (short film)

"In the near future social networking has moved out of the virtual world and into the physical. A confronting portrait of a world we may soon know too well. Welcome to the evolution." Winner of the Jury Prize Best Sci-Fi Short Maelstrom IFF 2011 - Winner Best Screenplay Dark Carnival Indiana IFF 2011 - Official Selection 14 International Festivals including Fantasia Montreal, Bermuda IFF, London Lift Off 2012, Chashama New York, - Eng - 19mins - Director: Richard Williamson- Online Release May 6th 2014. Hope you like it.
posted by neonmuse on May 6, 2014 - 1 comment

Decarboni.se

Hi everybody - we just launched Decarboni.se - a site that is collecting and organizing the world's solutions to climate change. We have over 17,000 resources online already and we're growing quickly. Thanks for your support Metafilter.
posted by Dag Maggot on Mar 17, 2014 - 2 comments

GMO Skepti-Forum: Reasoned, evidence-based Discourse

GMO SF is an independent, volunteer-run project built for encouraging rational dialogue amongst the global community on issues surrounding genetic-modification in society. Our bottom-up community discourse aims to advance scientific reasoning and skepticism while challenging misinformation and public manipulation. [more inside]
posted by Knigel on Feb 24, 2014 - 1 comment

Extrasolar

A few years ago, I helped build a prototype of an original idea for a web game, and today it's out of beta and open to all! "What is it?" you ask. It's one of the very few games in which you are yourself and not playing a character. It is an experience you can have over the course of a month or so, a few minutes at a time. It increases your understanding of exobiology. It's exploring a new planet, one picture at a time. [more inside]
posted by breath on Feb 19, 2014 - 10 comments

Dinosaurs!WTF?

This is my blog covering the Conservative Dinosaur Readiness Movement. It is a satirical blog about a right wing survivalist group that is paranoid that dinosaurs are going to return somehow and conquer earth. While it is satire, I also try to incorporate good science when I can, I interview legit people in the paleontology field such as Kirk Johnson and Peter Larson. [more inside]
posted by DinoswtfEd on Feb 7, 2014 - 3 comments

A History of the Future in 100 Objects

What are the 100 objects that future historians will pick to define our 21st century? A javelin thrown by an enhanced Paralympian, far further than any normal human? Virtual reality interrogation equipment used by police forces? The world's most expensive glass of water, mined from the moons of Mars? Or desire modification drugs that fuel a brand new religion? [more inside]
posted by adrianhon on Dec 9, 2013 - 1 comment

Blood in the Sandbox : a dystopian novella

I wrote this before I knew of the Hunger Games. If you like dystopian science fiction and medieval combat, you should give it a try.
posted by spacefire on Dec 9, 2013 - 0 comments

Amorphia Apparel's Badass Women of Science

To celebrate Ada Lovelace day on Oct 15th, which celebrates women in science and technology, I've expanded my selection of science themed t-shirts featuring women and collected them all (new and old) on one handy page. Since I know many of them aren't household names I've added a brief overview of each woman's best known accomplishments when you mouse over each design. Hope you like 'em!
posted by Jezztek on Oct 13, 2013 - 2 comments

GMO Skepti-Forum: Rational, Factual Biotech Discourse

The goal of GMO Skepti-Forum is to promote reasoned discussion of genetically modified organisms and anything that might help people discuss issues of GMOs and their roles in society. The forum is set up to answer questions, provide information, evaluate sources, and practice skepticism. Discussion should focus on facts, credible sources, and scientific literature. For a productive discussion, each person should adopt the principle of charity and help create an open atmosphere encouraging a mutual exchange of ideas. The forums are a collective puzzle solving activity rather than an arena of gladiators vying to defeat opponents. Some puzzle pieces might not fit so well, but flipping the table isn’t going to help anyone see the bigger picture. [more inside]
posted by Knigel on Oct 8, 2013 - 0 comments

Digital Covers for Over 400 Children's Books

I'm digitizing the covers of a significant portion of my children's book collection and posting them to my Flickr account. Among the items in that collection is a book shaped card game called Dr. Quack which is sort of like Mad Libs. I've parsed out the story and the accompanying cards into a twitter feed just for snicks and giggles. The rest of the books are typically either science books, textbooks, or early examples of cross media licensing based on comic strips, radio shows, TV shows, or movies. [more inside]
posted by Toekneesan on Sep 27, 2013 - 7 comments

Artists & scientists in the wilderness

I'm one of 18 artists participating in the Aldo & Leonardo project. I'm currently in residence at Canyons of the Ancients National Monument - the desert biome portion of the Aldo & Leonardo Project. The project puts artists and scientists together in wilderness settings. All of the artists and some of the scientists are blogging about our experiences and what we're learning. Most of the blogs at this point are wilderness focused - our major artwork will come when we return to our studios and that will be on the blog as well. [more inside]
posted by leslies on Sep 12, 2013 - 1 comment

Discussing Dimensions - animations for Sixty Symbols and Numberphile

I have been working with video journalist Brady Haran on a series of hand made animations for science videos. Other videos include:Numbers Confuse Americans, Maths Jokes Explained and Lagrange Points. I'm currently auctioning the drawings used to make the dimensions video here.
posted by pmcp on Aug 28, 2013 - 5 comments

Ever Upward - blogging about Space for Tor.com

Since early this year, I've been writing periodically about the science and engineering details behind current and upcoming NASA missions; most recently, I've posted a 27-page comic about a trip I made to the Kennedy Space Center to watch a satellite launch. There's an enormous amount of exciting work being done right now, and I'm doing my best to give a small cross-section of it a little more attention. [more inside]
posted by Narrative Priorities on Jul 29, 2013 - 1 comment

Stories About Monkeys

I am spending the next 11 months in the rainforest in Cote d'Ivoire studying monkey behavior! I'll be telling (hopefully) exciting stories of monkey chasing, fecal sample collecting, snake spotting, and the challenges of integrating myself into a village on the Liberian-Ivorian border at The Great Blue Erin.
posted by ChuraChura on Jun 19, 2013 - 1 comment

Crosses

A 5 minute scifi film. Two cops jump back in time to investigate a cold case. [more inside]
posted by metaBugs on Apr 9, 2013 - 6 comments

Ants and other insects doing what they do.

I've spent the last few years trekking around the tropics and doing ant research. Here are the insect photographs I've built up in this time, with relevant taxonomic/natural history information, and some .gifs for good measure. Expect sparse updates as I find and document more neat ant things. [more inside]
posted by Buckt on Mar 10, 2013 - 6 comments

Links To The Damn Paper

Hello and welcome to Links to the Damn Paper, an open discussion community showcasing the best in freely-available biology research. If you’ve ever tried to have a discussion about science on the Web and been stymied and frustrated by inaccessible articles, misrepresentation of research in science journalism, or a community that seems uninterested in digging into the actual research behind a topic, then welcome: you are our people. If you’ve ever wished for a place to talk about the Science of Life where you could be sure that the actual articles were available, where compelling research was presented in a way that allowed it to speak for itself, and where you could discuss science with actual scientists and with other people who are passionate about science for its own sake, then you have found your haven. [more inside]
posted by Blasdelb on Feb 19, 2013 - 10 comments

Phage treatment of human infections (PDF)

Phages as bactericidal agents have been employed for 90 years as a means of treating bacterial infections in humans as well as other species, a process known as phage therapy. In this review we explore both the early historical and more modern use of phages to treat human infections. We discuss in particular the little-reviewed French early work, along with the Polish, US, Georgian and Russian historical experiences. We also cover other, more modern examples of phage therapy of humans as differentiated in terms of disease. In addition, we provide discussions of phage safety, other aspects of phage therapy pharmacology, and the idea of phage use as probiotics.
posted by Blasdelb on Oct 30, 2012 - 0 comments

Science on Google+

Google+ isn't a ghost town anymore: populate your circles with Science! I co-curate Science on Google+: A Public Database, which among other things is a database of more than 600 different scientists, science teachers, and science writers active on Google+. We also host hangouts and provide a forum for asking science questions and finding collaborators among scientists on Google+. We also work closely with (and contribute to) two other science pages - STEM Women on Google+ and Science Sunday.
posted by ChuraChura on Sep 30, 2012 - 0 comments

ENCODE: The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements

After five years, the NIH-funded ENCODE Project has unveiled its detailed study of the biochemical context of the human genome. Nature has a special web portal linking together 24 publications in Nature, a special issue of Genome Research, and Genome Biology (all open access). There's also an iPad app to help you navigate through the papers and results. You can look at an enormous poster of results, but it contains only a tiny fraction of the 15 TB of data from the project's >1,600 experiments. Perhaps aerial dance is a better way of portraying what we have learned about genome biology. [more inside]
posted by grouse on Sep 5, 2012 - 4 comments

University of Denial

A lot of people think Larry Summers was forced to resign from Harvard for saying women can't do math. That is BS. When the Teresa Sullivan was abruptly fired from the presidency of the University of Virginia earlier this summer, the explanations offered up by the media were no less ridiculous: it was because Sullivan lacked "strategic dynamism" which was possibly code for "she's too fat to run a school Newsweek had named hottest college for fitness, or maybe the Board was still sore over that Lady Gaga class. But when students and professors returned from summer sabbaticals to protest the ouster on a campus more generally associated with Abercrombie & Fitch catalogs and killer lacrosse players, I knew something bigger and more existential was at stake. Specifically, I wondered if the ouster had anything to do with climate science and the state attorney general Kevin Cuccinelli's two year jihad against former UVA climate scientist Michael Mann of "hockey stick" fame. Well, it sure looks like the Board had a bigger beef with climate science than Lady Gaga studies! But now that I've amassed a pretty damning amount of evidence suggesting my instincts were correct, I can only assume the traditional media is persisting with its ridiculous 'Mean Girls' narrative of the clash because it has been intimidated by the over-the-top tantrums and libel lawsuit promises of the coup's conspirators. But while the papers speculate that Sullivan was the victim of "plus sized bullying" from the Board's svelte Rector Helen Dragas, the evidence suggests that UVA has mostly been bullied by its former extension campus—and hotbed of climate science denial—George Mason University. I have no personal stake in UVA's reputation—I rejected it at 17 on grounds it was "too fratty" and was immediately hoisted on my own petard by my first choice University of Pennsylvania—but I do believe it would be a profound loss to my home state if Thomas Jefferson's University went the way of its highly corporatized cousins, so I've been reporting on the saga pro bono at my personal site Das Krapital, dedicated loosely to the mission of unmasking (and mocking) corporate propaganda wherever I can still muster the outrage to do so.
posted by evabraunstein on Aug 25, 2012 - 0 comments

#SciFund 2: The Sci-Fundining

Science crowdfunding on the web is exploding with sites like Microryza, Petridish, and Cancer Research UK (which regularly brings in tens of thousands of pounds for projects). Now #SciFund, the largest science crowdfunding derby on the web is back, baby, for round 2. #SciFund is unique in that its purpose isn't just to crowdfund research, but to change academic culture and create better ties between scientists and the world around them. Indeed, after round 1, we did a number of fancy-pants analyses showing how scientists doing outreach work were going to be better able to use crowdfunding. Or just get the gestalt message from this post on Dr. Zen trying to become the Amanda Palmer of Science. But the real fun and joy of #SciFund is to see the videos these passionate scientists have made about their work... [more inside]
posted by redbeard on May 3, 2012 - 0 comments

Paleoart

A MLKSHK "shake" devoted to artistic representations of prehistoric life.
posted by brundlefly on Apr 3, 2012 - 2 comments

BEDOPS

BEDOPS is a suite of tools to address common questions raised in genomic studies, mostly with regard to overlap and proximity relationships between data sets. BEDOPS aims to be scalable, flexible and performant, facilitating the efficient and accurate analysis and management of large-scale genomic data.
posted by Blazecock Pileon on Mar 27, 2012 - 2 comments

This website presents a theory of everything

I also hope people are interested in the accompanying facebook group.
posted by leibniz on Mar 20, 2012 - 4 comments

The Kitchen as Laboratory: Reflections on the Science of Food and Cooking

A new, highly collaborative book on the relationship between science and cuisine. With recipes, new takes on old dishes, science, technology, history, and deliciousness. I am one of many authors and very excited to be keeping company with them. You may have heard of Molecular Gastronomy, Experimental Cuisine, Modernist Cuisine - here is some of the thinking and thinkers behind understanding food with science and science with food. First chapter for free here [more inside]
posted by zingiberene on Feb 7, 2012 - 2 comments

The Science of Magic

I like science. I like magic. This is my attempt to bring the two together. The Science of Magic is a series of easy to do magic tricks made available for the purpose of teaching students how to apply the scientific method in, what I hope will be, a fun and informative way. [more inside]
posted by Mister_Sleight_of_Hand on Jan 13, 2012 - 3 comments

Visiting Deep Space...in Queens

This incredible room at the Hall of Science in Queens was originally built for the 1964 World's Fair to give visitors the feeling of being in deep space. Really beautiful, unearthly design.
posted by nycscout on Nov 7, 2011 - 1 comment

The #SciFund Challenge

The #SciFund Challenge is a new project for scientists interested in coupling science and society through funding. There are a ton of cool projects - from studies of zombie fish to vaccine distribution in the developing world to some mefite yahoo working in kelp forests. And, of course, duck penises (nsfw?). The passion of the researchers is huge. And ways they're reaching out to a public audience is fascinating. The whole thing has the potential to change the often mysterious science funding process for the better and reshape the science ecosystem, even if just a little. Will it work? Who knows! It's an experiment!
posted by redbeard on Nov 1, 2011 - 0 comments

Hackerspaces in Space: Year 2

This is a project that I'm working on with some members of my local hackerspace. The project invites teams from around the world to compete in the design and assembly of a weather balloon equipped with cameras to take photos of the Earth from near space. We also are trying to promote this type of activity in schools by attempting to get balloon kits into science classrooms.
posted by achmorrison on Sep 28, 2011 - 0 comments

Steven Gawoski - Art & Theory

In commemoration of the opening of my Soho art show Hidden Spaces I am posting my new website. My art is comprised of graphite and monochrome color pencil works transcribed and augmented from microscopic organic forms. For further elaboration see my artist statement on my site.
posted by Lex Tangible on Sep 15, 2011 - 6 comments

Monsters of Grok: fake band shirts for history's greatest thinkers

If want to live in a world where being a scientist is considered bad ass, and philosophers are worshiped like rock stars, so my newest lineup of t-shirts parodies famous band logos by re-purposing them to celebrate some of the world's most influential minds. Hope you enjoy them.
posted by Jezztek on Aug 31, 2011 - 14 comments

MST3kdbx: Six Degrees of Peter Graves.

The Mystery Science Theater 3000 Connectivity Database cross-indexes all 199 experiments (inclusive of the KTMA years and the movie) and their 3707 actors, sorted by strength of connectivity within the MST3k canon. At last, the common relational path from Deathstalker and the Warriors from Hell to Lassie: The Painted Hills can be traced! Witness the inescapable Isle of Kaiju! Quake at the Old-Fashioned Nightmare Fuel of the Mexican Archipelago! Most of all, Keep Traversing the Nodes.
posted by lx on Aug 29, 2011 - 7 comments

Singular Source Short Story Contest

“Singular Source” is a hard science fiction short story contest. We are looking for stories on the theme of future computer programming and technology, with particular attention to programmers working with vast archives of source code. The deadline is November 30, 2011. Visit our web site for more details. You can support the contest by donating money for prizes and honorariums for judges. [more inside]
posted by mausburger on Aug 21, 2011 - 0 comments

Scientific Side-Lights

I have a big honkin' encyclopedic book of science from 1902, and I blog one excerpt from it every day. [more inside]
posted by mismatched on Aug 15, 2011 - 1 comment

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